Podcasts: Yet another adventure

In December last year, thanks to the invitation of Glenn McDorman, I had the opportunity to speak about Byzantium and in particular, about Byzantine science and philosophy on an episode of Agnus: The Late Antique, Medieval, and Byzantine Podcast. Many thanks should go to Glenn for his curiosity, for his excellent questions and for being the wonderful host and driving force behind Agnus. As for me, that was a challenging experience, but definitely worthwhile trying and it has kindled my desire to do delve further into the world of podcasts.

You can listen to the episode here:

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Speaking about ‘new’ things in Bucharest

In January 2016, the organizers of the CELFIS seminar, a series of weekly public lectures dedicated to the history and philosophy of science hosted by the Department of Theoretical Philosophy of the University of Bucharest, invited me to present my research. The result was a talk entitled Theodore Metochites and Nikephoros Gregoras on philomatheia and polymatheia.

Always excited to try something new

From Barn-Raising seminar and extended simulations to using ‘word clouds,’ wikis, blogs, and social bookmarking in the context of group assignments, I am always on the lookout for learning about and incorporating relevant innovative methods and tools in my teaching. As a student I am also adventurous and it is not by chance that I was the first CEU student to attend a course from a distance while on a research fellowship in Turkey. The video case study below includes the thoughts and reflections of my colleagues and me based on our shared experience of the integration of actual and virtual class rooms.